Did Someone Say Mud Run?

Spring time can bring rain and muddy conditions which might be perfect if you are doing a Mud Runner 5K. However, less desirable when your horse comes in lame or worse yet, cannot get up from a slip and fall. There are many safety considerations when managing horses in muddy conditions.

Mud can lead to slippery surfaces including paddocks, pastures, and barn entrances. To help control excessively muddy areas of the barn or paddock entrances, direct water runoff away from the entrances/exits of walkways. This will help prevent accumulation of sand, clay, dirt, and water that contribute to a slippery surface. When pastures or paddocks have low areas where water may accumulate, many horses many get the urge to frolic in those slippery areas. Preventing access to or sectioning off those areas can be beneficial until safely dried out. If you have the resources, consulting a field or landscaping specialist, filling in or redirecting water to a safe runoff location is ideal. Horses housed in outdoor turnouts with a shelter or structure often spend time seeking cover out of the rain. A thorough inspection of the footing and drainage away from these areas are a necessary safety consideration as mud, water and waste can accumulate and lead to slippery conditions as horses head to covered areas to get out of the rain. Evaluating your facility for water runoff prior to or at the beginning of the rainy season will help prevent slippery conditions.

After turnout if conditions are muddy watch for signs of injury such as unequal gait, sidewinding or other signs of pain. If any abnormalities occur after muddy conditions consult your veterinarian for an examination.

Other considerations following rainy weather are increased awareness with hoof health. Thrush, which is involves an infection of the horse’s hoof. This condition can be caused by moist, damp, dirty ground or stable conditions. Canker or foot rot in horses is a condition that causes the foot to “rot” away, moist environments often lead to Canker conditions for horses. If you suspect a hoof infection or notice any foul hoof odor, consult your Veterinarian and farrier for treatment. To prevent hoof moisture issues, inspection of hooves daily, control standing water or excessively moist footing to prevent hoof issues.

Ask any reputable pest control specialist and their advice when trying to control mosquitos, roaches, insects or rodents is to control the environmental moisture. All living things rely upon water for survival. Pests often enjoy the soggy areas around buildings, vegetation and other areas that most humans do not spend meticulous effort to keep dry. Drainage systems, gutters, vapor barriers, ventilation and weed/lawn/pasture upkeep are key in pest prevention. Consult a pest control professional who is experienced in working in animal safe environments.